Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10)

Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10)
Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10) Packet 3: Backyard Bounty (bare root bundle of 10)
Product Code: BR Specialty Packet
Availability: Out Of Stock
Price: $24.00
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Fruits and berries in this packet feed wildlife and humans alike. The red mulberry is similar to the introduced Chinese white mulberry, and the two hybridize. The female fruit of sumacs can be collected, soaked and washed in cold water, strained, sweetened and made into a pink lemonade.

Includes 10 bare root seedlings (12-18"), 2 of each species listed below:

  • Red Mulberry, Morus rubra
    • Red mulberry, is a medium sized, upright spreading to rounded, deciduous tree that typically grows to 35-50’ (less frequently to 80’) tall. It is native to rich woods, bottomlands and wood margins from Massachusetts, southern Ontario and Minnesota south to Florida and Texas. Leaves turn yellow in fall. Unisexual greenish flowers in small catkin-like spikes appear in early spring with male and female flowers usually appearing on separate trees (dioecious). Trees with only male flowers obviously never bear fruit. Fertilized female flowers are followed by sweet blackberry-like edible fruits (to 1” long) that are reddish to dark purple in color. Fruits are sweet and juicy and may be eaten off the tree. Fruits are also used for jellies, jams and wines. Fruits are also very attractive to birds.  Tree also serves as a larval host plant for the Mourning Cloak butterfly. http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/mulberry
  • Allegheny Serviceberry, Amelanchier laevis
    • This small multi-trunked tree/tall shrub has a mature height range of 15-25’. Prefers partly shaded sites. A nice ornamental for home landscapes and a good choice for bird enthusiasts: small white flower clusters in early spring, ripening to tasty dark berries. Nice fall colors in  yellow, orange, and red.
  • Black Elderberry, Sambucus canadensis
    • A greatly versatile shrub that can reach 5-12’ in height. Adaptable in locations that receive sun or part shade with average well-drained soils.  Blooms appear June-July and are followed by 0.25” purplish-black berries that attract songbirds, upland birds and other wildlife.  Fruits can also be used to make jam, jellies, pies, and wine.  Tolerant of black walnut trees.
  • Pawpaw, Asimina triloba
    • Pawpaw is a native, large multi-stemmed shrub or small tree that slowly forms thickets or small colonies, providing good cover for a variety of wildlife and reaching 15-30’ tall.  Dark purple flowers emerge with the leaves in April/May and fruits ripen from July to September, attracting squirrel, fox, opossum, and raccoon.  Easily grown in average, medium to wet, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade.  A great selection for naturalizing or in damp areas along ponds and streams.  Tolerant of black walnut trees. http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/pawpaw
  • Staghorn Sumac, Rhus typhina
    • This is the largest of our shrub sumacs, not to be confused with the poisonous tree! In fact, bees find spring-blooming flowers attractive, and songbirds and gamebirds alike relish fruit clusters that are borne on the female plants. Individuals grow 13-30', suckering to form thickets if allowed. Grown as ornamental for autumn color, leaves and fruits, sumacs are extremely tough plants that thrive in poor, dry soils.
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